Paradox and self-evident sentences

According to philosophical lore many sentences are self-evident. A self-evident sentence wears its semantic status on its sleeve: a self-evident truth is a true sentence whose truth strikes us
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According to philosophical lore many sentences are self-evident. A self-evident sentence wears its semantic status on its sleeve: a self-evident truth is a true sentence whose truth strikes us immediately, without the need for any argument or evidence, once we understand what the sentence means (and similarly, a self-evident falsehood wears its falsity on its sleeve in a similar manner). Some paradigm examples of self-evident truths, according to those who believe in such things at least, include the law of non-contradiction: No sentence is both true and false at the same time. which was championed as self-evidently true by Aristotle, and: 1+1 = 2 Note that if a claim is self-evidently true, then its negation is self-evidently false. Now, it seems like we have good reasons for the following claim to seem at least initially plausible: No self-referential statement is self-evident (whether true, false, or otherwise). One thing that becomes somewhat obvious once we look at. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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