Three Options in the Epistemology of Philosophy

You pursue your arguments as far as they go, and eventually reach your bedrock assumptions: foundational premises that you accept (and might describe as seeming 'intuitive' to you), but that you can
Philosophy News image
You pursue your arguments as far as they go, and eventually reach your bedrock assumptions: foundational premises that you accept (and might describe as seeming 'intuitive' to you), but that you can give no further argument for.  Further, you realize that coherent philosophical diversity is possible: others could, coherently, accept (and find 'intuitive') different starting points from yours.  What should you do about it?One might deny the stipulated set-up, and insist that there is ultimately only one internally coherent philosophical world view.  But that seems unlikely, so I will put aside that ambitious view for now.  One might also reject the "foundationalist" structure I've assumed above, defending instead the idea that our beliefs might form an interlocking (ultimately circular, but "mutually supporting") web, with no privileged starting points.  But I think what I say below will be easily translatable into coherentist idiom: the question just becomes. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Philosophy, et cetera

blog comments powered by Disqus