Leibniz's Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation

2015.10.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adrian Nita (ed.), Leibniz's Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation, Springer,
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2015.10.12 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Adrian Nita (ed.), Leibniz's Metaphysics and Adoption of Substantial Forms: Between Continuity and Transformation, Springer, 2015, 176pp., $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789401799553. Reviewed by Julia Jorati, The Ohio State University When presenting his new system to the public in a 1695 journal article, Leibniz claimed that he was originally attracted to a purely mechanistic view of the world. Yet, he soon came to realize that it was "impossible to find the principles of a true unity in matter alone" and that it was "necessary to restore and as it were rehabilitate the substantial forms that are so often denounced today" (Gerhardt, Die Philosophischen Schriften, 4:478f.). Substantial forms are central to Aristotelianism -- widely accepted in medieval Europe -- according to which material substances consist of matter and an organizing principle that is called 'form.' These forms are supposed to account for the. . .

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