Medieval Theories of Singular Terms

[Revised entry by E. Jennifer Ashworth on October 9, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A singular term, such as a proper name or a demonstrative pronoun, is a term that signifies exactly
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[Revised entry by E. Jennifer Ashworth on October 9, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] A singular term, such as a proper name or a demonstrative pronoun, is a term that signifies exactly one individual thing. The existence of singular terms raises various questions about how they function within a language. Do proper names have a sense as well as a referent? If they do have a sense, what is it, and how do they acquire it? How is this sense transmitted from one speaker to another? Is a demonstrative pronoun purely referential? If one believes in a language of thought,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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