For the love of reason

Throughout much of the last century, the idea that we inhabit a somehow disenchanted modernity has exerted a powerful hold in political and public debate. As the political theorist Jane Bennett
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Throughout much of the last century, the idea that we inhabit a somehow disenchanted modernity has exerted a powerful hold in political and public debate. As the political theorist Jane Bennett argues, the story is that there was once a time when God acted in human affairs and when social life, characterized by face-to-face relations, was richer; but this world then ‘gave way to forces of scientific and instrumental rationality, secularism, individualism, and the bureaucratic state – all of which, combined, disenchant the world.’ In this story, reason and religion are oppositional forces, the one succeeding the other. If the path to rationality is interpreted as the process of becoming possessed of and determined by one’s own mind, then this is surely fundamentally at odds with the religious desire for obedience to a revelatory divine voice. To some extent, the return of religion to public and political forums of discussion has challenged this narrative. It has been problematized,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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