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Global health inequalities and the “brain drain”

There are massive inequalities in global health opportunities and outcomes.  Consider, for instance, that Japan has around twenty-one physicians per 10,000 people, while Malawi has only one
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There are massive inequalities in global health opportunities and outcomes.  Consider, for instance, that Japan has around twenty-one physicians per 10,000 people, while Malawi has only one physician for every fifty thousand people.  This radical inequality in medical skills and talents has, obviously, bad consequences for health; people born in Malawi will live, on average, 32 years fewer than their counterparts born in Japan.  These facts are troubling in themselves.  They become even more troubling, though, when we start asking why nations like Malawi have so few physicians.  The answer, it seems, is not that the citizens of developing countries have no interest in becoming physicians, or a lack of opportunity for medical training; in many cases, developing societies spend a great deal of money training new physicians, and spots in medical school are avidly sought.  The reason for the low numbers of physicians, instead, has much to do with what medical training provides: namely,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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