Women in the history of philosophy

For the most part, the practice of philosophy tends to be collective and conversational and collaborative. We enjoy reading what others have written on a given topic, and we like to hear what others
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Philosophers have been happily borrowing and stealing ideas from others for centuries. We like to call it “research.” For the most part, the practice of philosophy tends to be collective and conversational and collaborative. We enjoy reading what others have written on a given topic, and we like to hear what others have to say, because different people see things differently. Their comments and criticisms can open our minds to uncontemplated truths, or else they can encourage us to close ranks, and strengthen our arguments, in light of opposition. Face-to-face, this practice is not always for the faint-of-heart and thin-of-skin. The argumentative nature of the discipline can be challenging for introverts and for those with a disposition toward politeness and common human civility. But the funny thing is, despite its brutal reputation, philosophy is actually quite inclusive by nature. For many philosophers, it doesn’t matter if their interlocutors are under-educated, under-privileged,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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