Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy

2015.09.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jacqueline A. Taylor, Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2015,
Philosophy News image
2015.09.30 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jacqueline A. Taylor, Reflecting Subjects: Passion, Sympathy, and Society in Hume's Philosophy, Oxford University Press, 2015, 196pp., $60.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198729525. Reviewed by Christopher Williams, University of Nevada, Reno In the final paragraph of his Treatise of Human Nature, Hume declared that while the "anatomist ought never to emulate the painter," the former was "admirably fitted to give advice" to the latter and added that it was "even impracticable" to paint without doing the anatomical homework first. Hume's own ambition in the Treatise lay in psychological (and, increasingly, sociologically informed) anatomy, not engaging portraiture, but he clearly envisaged a progression from one to the other. Exploiting abundant textual sources, Jacqueline A. Taylor provides us, on Hume's behalf, with a progression of this sort in her book. She begins with a reconstruction of selected elements in Hume's. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

blog comments powered by Disqus