Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification

2015.09.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin McCain, Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification, Routledge, 2014, 172pp., $145.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415714822.
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2015.09.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kevin McCain, Evidentialism and Epistemic Justification, Routledge, 2014, 172pp., $145.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415714822. Reviewed by Todd R. Long, California Polytechnic State University Evidentialism is the view that the doxastic attitudes that are epistemically justified/rational for a person to have are those that fit (or support) the person’s evidence. The thought that we need reasons, via evidence, in order to have rational belief is among the more compelling, common sense ideas in philosophy. Indeed, until recent times it didn’t occur to philosophers that what is nowadays called ‘epistemic justification/rationality’ might be about anything other than having evidence. Nevertheless, today there are evidentialist detractors. Although many critics of evidentialism have displayed an astonishing lack of imagination or a failure to exercise the principle of charity,1 some criticisms and challenges deserve. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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