Paradoxes and promises

Imagine that, on a Tuesday night, shortly before going to bed one night, your roommate says “I promise to only utter truths tomorrow.” The next day, your roommate spends the entire day uttering
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Imagine that, on a Tuesday night, shortly before going to bed one night, your roommate says “I promise to only utter truths tomorrow.” The next day, your roommate spends the entire day uttering unproblematic truths like: 1 + 1 = 2. The grass is green. The sky is blue. She continues on, in this vein, until going to bed. As she is about to fall asleep (and we assume she goes to bed before midnight), she proudly pronounces: I kept my promise. The question is this: Has she? Your roommate’s pronouncement has a similar logical form to the truth-teller: This sentence is true. Unlike the Liar paradox: This sentence is false. which is true if false, and false if true, the truth-teller is true if true, and false if false. So it is indeterminate between the two truth-value assignments – it could be either one, and no inconsistency, incoherence, or any other sort of problem arises either way. Likewise, your roommate’s pronouncement is, logically speaking, indeterminate. If we assume that is. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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