Life during the culture wars

Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle Our political Manichaeism Throughout his recent book Moral Tribes (2013), American psychologist and experimental philosopher Joshua Greene portrays a
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Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle Our political Manichaeism Throughout his recent book Moral Tribes (2013), American psychologist and experimental philosopher Joshua Greene portrays a cultural and political tribalism that divides modern liberal democracies into groups of angry, warring enemies. Likewise, high-profile social psychologist Jonathan Haidt emphasizes what he sees as a “political Manichaeism” in current cultural and political debate. Manichaeism was an ancient religion, dating from the 3rd century, whose key teaching was a supernatural dualism of absolute good and evil confronting each other in an ongoing cosmic struggle. Too often, it appears, disputants over cultural and political issues take a similar attitude; they see themselves as involved in a struggle for political power against utterly evil opponents. This creates an environment inhospitable to compromise, reason, good will, and ordinary civility. In such an environment, tribalists demand ever more costly. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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