Philosophy versus science versus politics

Philosophy versus science versus politics Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle We might hope that good arguments will eventually drive out bad arguments – in what Timothy Williamson calls “a
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Philosophy versus science versus politics Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle We might hope that good arguments will eventually drive out bad arguments – in what Timothy Williamson calls “a reverse analogue of Gresham’s Law” – and we might want (almost?) complete freedom for ideas and arguments, rather than suppressing potentially valuable ones. Unfortunately, it takes honesty and effort before the good arguments can defeat the bad. Williamson on philosophy and science In a field such as philosophy, the reverse Gresham’s Law analogue may be too optimistic, as Williamson suggests. Williamson points out that very often a philosopher profoundly wants one answer rather than another to be the right one. He or she may thus be predisposed to accept certain arguments and to reject others. If the level of obscurity is high in a particular field of discussion (as will almost always be the case with philosophical controversies), “wishful thinking may be more powerful than the ability to. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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