Conservatives should embrace same-sex marriage

Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle In the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, decided on 26 June 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States has ruled by a 5-4 majority in favour of same-sex
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Russell Blackford, University of Newcastle In the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, decided on 26 June 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States has ruled by a 5-4 majority in favour of same-sex marriage. The majority judges have held that state governments must license same-sex marriages and recognize same-sex marriages lawfully licensed and performed elsewhere. The SCOTUS decision The “opinion of the Court” – i.e. the opinion commanding a majority of judges – was delivered by Justice Kennedy, joined by Justices Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor, and Kagan. Chief Justice Roberts dissented, along with Justices Scalia, Thomas, and Alito. Although I have not yet digested the entire 100 pages of the judges’ opinions, it is clear that the case turned on the court’s interpretation of the US Constitution’s Fourteenth Amendment, which, most relevantly, requires as follows: “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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