What has experimental philosophy discovered about demographic effects?

In a recent post, I discussed a new study showing that people's intuitions about Gettier cases are remarkably invariant across cultures. This post generated a whole lot of discussion on social
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In a recent post, I discussed a new study showing that people's intuitions about Gettier cases are remarkably invariant across cultures. This post generated a whole lot of discussion on social media, and although most of this discussion was extremely helpful and well-informed, I worry that some of it betrays a confusion about what experimental philosophy is all about. Some commenters seem to assume that it is somehow built into the mission of experimental philosophy as a field that part of its aim is to show that intuitions vary from one demographic group to the next and that appeals to intuitions are therefore methodologically suspect. As anyone who actually works in experimental philosophy will know, this assumption is wildly incorrect. The mission of experimental philosophy as a field is not argue for any one particular view but rather to systematically study these questions and find the truth about them, whatever that truth might be.Consider again the particular case of research. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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