The Neoplatonic Socrates

2015.08.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Danielle A. Layne and Harold Tarrant (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014, 256pp., $75.00
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2015.08.34 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Danielle A. Layne and Harold Tarrant (eds.), The Neoplatonic Socrates, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014, 256pp., $75.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780812246292. Reviewed by Pauliina Remes, Uppsala University According to an ossified view, Socrates and Neoplatonism are not only chronologically at the two extreme ends of ancient philosophy. They are also methodologically and philosophically worlds apart. Socrates wrote nothing, spent his time in open-ended discussions, uninterested in metaphysical questions. The Neoplatonic philosophers, however, worked with texts, producing extensive commentaries to classical philosophical texts, striving to reveal the dogmatic truth within them, and creating a more and more complex metaphysical system. Caricatures work because they highlight some striking, existing features of their objects. But their truth is not merely a simplification: to work, they have to hide and disregard. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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