The value of knowledge

Traditionally, the story that opens chapter three of Genesis is called The Fall. In the Christian tradition, both the name and the interpretation of the story associated with it were made canonical
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Traditionally, the story that opens chapter three of Genesis is called ‘The Fall’. In the Christian tradition, both the name and the interpretation of the story associated with it were made canonical by Saint Augustine in the first decades of the fifth century AD, about fourteen hundred years after Genesis was written down. The interpretation, which derives essentially from Paul’s letter to the Romans, is as follows. Before they ate the knowledge-giving fruit, Adam and Eve were, we are told in the last verse of chapter two, “naked and not ashamed”. (According to Augustine, their nakedness was not shameful for the odd reason, which has no basis in the Bible, that the physical signs of sexual arousal were until then under their voluntary control). Satan, a fallen angel, envious of man’s innocent and non-fallen state, chose the serpent to “insinuate his persuasive guile into the mind of man” because “being slippery, and moving in tortuous windings, it was suitable for his. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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