Puzzles re: Kant on the Good Will

Two puzzling arguments from Chapter 1 of Kant's Groundwork:(1) He begins by suggesting that the only thing "good without qualification" is the good will.  Why? Because (i) anything else could
Philosophy News image
Two puzzling arguments from Chapter 1 of Kant's Groundwork:(1) He begins by suggesting that the only thing "good without qualification" is the good will.  Why? Because (i) anything else could turn out to be instrumentally bad, in the hands (or head) of one who lacked good will, and (ii) undeserved happiness lacks positive value.The first consideration is very puzzling, because a good will could also turn out to be instrumentally bad (e.g. for a person who is anti-reliable at achieving their goals).  So if to be "good without qualification" is to mean that it can't possibly be of instrumental disvalue then a good will is not good without qualification either.  On the other hand, if we are instead merely concerned with whether something is unconditionally pro tanto good, then his primary argument against other putative goods (e.g. intelligence, courage, and wellbeing) collapses.The second reason is also puzzling, because it merely suggests that we need a. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Philosophy, et cetera

blog comments powered by Disqus