Rousseau and Hobbes: Nature, Free Will, and the Passions

2015.08.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robin Douglass, Rousseau and Hobbes: Nature, Free Will, and the Passions, Oxford University Press, 2015, 220pp., $66.00 (bhk),
Philosophy News image
2015.08.26 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robin Douglass, Rousseau and Hobbes: Nature, Free Will, and the Passions, Oxford University Press, 2015, 220pp., $66.00 (bhk), ISBN 9780198724964. Reviewed by Richard Velkley, Tulane University In this thoughtful, gracefully written and impressively-researched book, Robin Douglass begins with a remark of Rousseau in a letter to the economist Marquis de Mirabeau, that the problem of politics is to find a form of government where law is placed above man, and should this never be found, it is necessary to turn to the other extreme "and establish the most arbitrary despotism, or 'the most perfect Hobbism'" (2). This remark, which shows how very near Rousseau is to being a Hobbist, nicely sets the stage for Douglass's statement of his purpose, namely, to show that "some of Roussseau's most important philosophical ideas were either set out in direct opposition to Hobbes, or developed in an anti-Hobbesian. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

blog comments powered by Disqus