The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists

2015.07.42 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews James Warren, The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists, Cambridge University Press, 2014,
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2015.07.42 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews James Warren, The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists, Cambridge University Press, 2014, 234pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107025448.   Reviewed by Tim O'Keefe, Georgia State University This book begins with a look at a passage in Plato's Philebus that explores the contributions of reasoning and pleasure to a good life. Socrates and his interlocutor Protarchus agree that a good human life will involve both reasoning and pleasure. But reasoning and pleasure are not just two separate components of a good life, with a bit of reasoning here followed by an episode of pleasure there. Instead, as Warren puts it, "human reasoning gives rise to pleasures and pains of its own: there are pleasures of thinking, believing, learning, remembering, and so on." (2) Warren's volume explores these pleasures of reason. Just as Socrates does in the Philebus, Warren uses the term "reasoning". . .

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