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The Liar paradox arises when we consider the following declarative sentence: This sentence is false. Given some initially intuitive platitudes about truth, the Liar sentence is true if and only if
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The Liar paradox — a paradox that has been debated for hundreds of years — arises when we consider the following declarative sentence: “This sentence is false.” Given some initially intuitive platitudes about truth, the Liar sentence is true if and only if it is false. Thus, the Liar sentence can’t be true, and can’t be false, violating out intuition that all declarative sentences are either true or false (and not both). There are many variants of the Liar paradox. For example, we can formulate relatively straightforward examples of interrogative Liar paradoxes, such as the following Liar question: “Is the answer to this question ‘no’?” If the correct answer to this question is “yes”, then the correct answer to the question is “no”, and vice versa. Thus the Liar question is a yes-or-no question that we cannot correctly answer with either “yes” or “no”. Interestingly, I couldn’t think of any clear examples of exclamatory variants of the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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