On ‘cookbook medicine,’ cookbooks, and gender

It is not a compliment to say that a physician is practicing “cookbook medicine.” Rather, it suggests that the physician is employing a "one size fits all" approach, applying unreflective,
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It is not a compliment to say that a physician is practicing “cookbook medicine.” Rather, it suggests that the physician is applying “one size fits all,” unreflective, and impersonal clinical methods, and that the patient may suffer as a result of the lack of nuanced, reflective, and humanistic care. The best physicians—just like the best cooks —make use of creativity, intuition, judgment, and even je ne sais quoi. Explicit algorithms of care do not capture these apparently vital skills. The term “cookbook medicine” was used as early as the 1970s to object to the then-new institution of the medical consensus conference, which brings experts together to make joint recommendations about clinical practice. The term has been used frequently since then, especially in conjunction with the recommendations of evidence-based medicine, which are based on the results of large clinical trials. “Cookbook medicine” is also seen as “medicine by committee” that can challenge the authority of the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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