Monthly etymology gleanings for February 2015

One month is unlike another. Sometimes I receive many letters and many comments; then lean months may follow. February produced a good harvest (“February fill the dyke,” as they used to say), and I
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One month is unlike another. Sometimes I receive many letters and many comments; then lean months may follow. February produced a good harvest (“February fill the dyke,” as they used to say), and I can glean a bagful. Perhaps I should choose a special title for my gleanings: “I Am All Ears” or something like it. Unfortunately, every good title, witty pun, and memorable rhyme, including The Importance of Being Earnest and intellectual / hen pecked you all, has already been used by others. Perhaps my “ears” have also occurred to some gleaner more than a hundred years ago. I did not check. House between Germanic and Slavic How do we know that Slavic borrowed Germanic hus (long u, that is, a vowel of Modern Engl. boo, coo, woo), the older form of house, rather than the other way around? Could hus be a loanword from Slavic? The situation is apparently so obvious that no one found it necessary to discuss it, not even A. Stender-Petersen, the author of the old but still most useful book. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Linguistics

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