Is pleasure all that matters?

This week I convened a philosophy seminar in Oxford with Kasia de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer. Singer is probably the world’s most famous living philosopher, well known for his pioneering work on
Philosophy News image
This week I convened a philosophy seminar in Oxford with Kasia de Lazari-Radek and Peter Singer. Singer is probably the world’s most famous living philosopher, well known for his pioneering work on the ethics of our treatment of non-human animals, on global poverty, and on many other issues. Less well known, perhaps, is the fact that Singer has recently changed his mind on the question of what really matters. I’m talking here about what matters for individual beings – what makes their lives good or bad for them. For many years Singer took the view that what makes the lives of persons, like you and me, good for us is the satisfaction of certain preferences or desires. This enabled him to argue, for example, that there is something especially bad about killing a person, because – unlike non-persons – they would have had a preference to go on living, and by killing them one is making sure that that preference remains unfulfilled. What about non-persons, and in particular most non-human. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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