How is the mind related to the body?

At one point in the recent film The Imitation Game the detective assigned to his case asks Alan Turing whether machines could think. The dialogue that follows is perhaps not very illuminating
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At one point in the recent film The Imitation Game the detective assigned to his case asks Alan Turing whether machines could think. The dialogue that follows is perhaps not very illuminating philosophically, but it does remind us of an important point: the computer revolution that Turing helped to pioneer gave a huge impetus to interest in what we now call the mind-body problem. In other words, how is the mind related to the body? How could a soggy grey mass such as the brain give rise to the extraordinary phenomenon of consciousness? The mind-body problem is one of the most controversial issues in philosophy today, and it generates intense passions among the parties to the debate (witness the recent exchange between Galen Strawson and other philosophers in the correspondence columns of the Times Literary Supplement). Some modern philosophers, such as Colin McGinn, believe that the mind-body problem is so intractable that we shall never be able to solve it; we simply don’t possess. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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