Authoritative speech

There are various more or less familiar acts by which to communicate something with the reasonable expectation of being believed. We can do so by stating, reporting, contending, or claiming that
Philosophy News image
There are various more or less familiar acts by which to communicate something with the reasonable expectation of being believed. We can do so by stating, reporting, contending, or claiming that such-and-such is the case; by telling others things, informing an audience of this-or-that, or vouching for something; by affirming or attesting to something’s being the case, or avowing that this-or-that is true. What do these acts have in common? Each is an instance of the kind of speech act known as an assertion. Acts of assertion are of great philosophical significance. For one thing, assertions are apt for transmitting knowledge, and so they are of interest to the theory of knowledge. (What is knowledge, such that it can be transmitted through speech in this way?) For another, it is by asserting things that speakers typically express their beliefs. As a result, acts of this type can shed light on the relation between mind and language, thought and speech. Third, assertions appear to be. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

blog comments powered by Disqus