Talkin’ about a ‘Revolution’

Amid Fourth of July parades and fireworks, I found myself asking this: why do we call this day 'Independence Day' rather than 'Revolution Day?' The short answer,of course, is that on 4 July, we
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Amid Fourth of July parades and fireworks, I found myself asking this: why do we call this day ‘Independence Day’ rather than ‘Revolution Day?’ The short answer, of course, is that on 4 July, we celebrate the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a day that has been commemorated since 1777. And the term ‘Independence Day’ has its earliest citation in the Oxford English Dictionary from 1791, when it appeared in an entry in Jacob Hiltzheimer’s Diary: ‘This being Independence Day,’ the Pennsylvania assemblyman wrote, ‘the Governor invited several of the neighbors to dine with him.’ In 1870, Congress got around to making Independence Day a holiday for federal employees (though it was an unpaid holiday until 1938). In school, however, the events of 1775 through 1783 may either be called the War of American Independence or the Revolutionary War. The term ‘War of American Independence’ suggests a struggle to become. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Linguistics

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