Coleridge’s way with words

Why should we commemorate Samuel Taylor Coleridge? The obvious reason is his high status as a poet, but a better one might be his exuberance as a wordsmith. As a poet, after all, he is widely known
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Why should we commemorate Samuel Taylor Coleridge? The obvious reason is his high status as a poet, but a better one might be his exuberance as a wordsmith. As a poet, after all, he is widely known for only two relatively short works: ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’ and ‘Kubla Khan.’ While the academy would no doubt add four or five others prized by specialists, the total number is still small. On the other hand, Coleridge’s creative output as a word worker—inventing, importing, adapting, and generally messing about with language—is enormous, his impact incalculable. His collected works now fill 50 volumes in the standard scholarly editions, and his mastery of the arts of language is evident in every one of them. Coleridge in the OED Since his prose had a respectable following in the nineteenth century, when much of his informal writing (letters, notebooks, and marginalia) also found its way into print, his works were a mainstay of James Murray’s NED (New English Dictionary on. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Linguistics

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