Experimental Philosophy from the 1950s

As some of you may know, the movement known as 'experimental philosophy' was not the first to suggest running rigorous experimental studies about people's ordinary intuitions. There was a
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As some of you may know, the movement known as 'experimental philosophy' was not the first to suggest running rigorous experimental studies about people's ordinary intuitions. There was a philosophical movement in the mid-twentieth century that conducted studies along similar lines, but that earlier movement was completely defeated by its more a prioristic opponents.  Independent of any philosophical significance this earlier movement may have had, it seems amply worthy of study on a purely historical level. If we want to understand how twentieth century analytic philosophy ended up taking the form it did, it seems like we need a better understanding of how it was able to fend off approaches that called for more systematic empirical research. This question seems especially pressing when it comes to approaches within analytic philosophy that emphasized the importance of ordinary language. Proponents of this 'ordinary language philosophy' showed an interesting mixture of commitments. On. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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