Ethics and the Global Financial Crisis: Why Incompetence is Worse than Greed

2015.06.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Boudewijn de Bruin, Ethics and the Global Financial Crisis: Why Incompetence is Worse than Greed, Cambridge University Press,
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2015.06.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Boudewijn de Bruin, Ethics and the Global Financial Crisis: Why Incompetence is Worse than Greed, Cambridge University Press, 2015, 228pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781107028913. Reviewed by Pietro Maffettone, Durham University It is fair to say that the 2008 financial crisis has attracted a great deal of academic interest. Explanations of its causes range from deficient regulatory structures, to conflicts of interest, economic imbalances due to trade and capital liberalization, and the increased reliance on access to credit as a panacea for the deterioration of middle-income families' balance sheets (see Davies, 2010 for an accessible overview). Concerns over the ethical problems raised by the crisis have also abounded: tales of greed, impropriety, and moral hazard have dominated news programs and parliamentary hearings. However, proper philosophical interventions into the debate have been limited (of course. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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