The Inside/Outside Distinction and Epistemic Intuitions

Psychologists sometimes distinguish between two ways of getting evidence about a particular object. One way is to actually be in some kind of contact with the object itself, either by perceiving it
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Psychologists sometimes distinguish between two ways of getting evidence about a particular object. One way is to actually be in some kind of contact with the object itself, either by perceiving it directly or by observing something that has been caused by it (inside view). A second way is to learn certain facts about a more general category of which this object is a member (outside view). Clearly, these two ways of getting evidence could turn out to be similar with regard to their reliability and with regard to the extent to which they allow a person to rule out alternative possibilities. Still, it seems that people have the intuition that these two kinds of evidence are deeply different from an epistemic point of view. That is, people feel that actually perceiving or examining an object is deeply different somehow from just making inferences about the object from more general information about a category. Psychologist Ori Friedman and philosopher John Turri have a new paper in which. . .

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