Through Stereotypes to Intuitions

Many philosophical intuitions are prompted by verbal case descriptions. Psycholinguistic research has uncovered automatic association processes in semantic memory which are routinely executed in
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Many philosophical intuitions are prompted by verbal case descriptions. Psycholinguistic research has uncovered automatic association processes in semantic memory which are routinely executed in language comprehension and production. They duplicate inferences governed by heuristic rules and can generate ‘intuitions’ in a strict aetiological sense of the term. Such routine processes might therefore account for some of the intuitions philosophers have when reading or authoring case descriptions. In the context of conceptual analysis, inferences in line with pragmatic heuristics are easily regarded as just another source of annoying performance errors. In other pursuits, however, the apparent noise may well be precisely the signal we seek. In two forthcoming papers, in Mind and Language, and an edited collection (Routledge 2015), posted here and here, we (philosopher Eugen Fischer and psycholinguist Paul Engelhardt) examine the routine process of stereotype-driven amplification that is. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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