The process of publishing a paper: some data from one person's experience

There is a lot of advice out there on publishing in philosophy (see Aidan McGlynn’s useful compilation). And there are a lot of statistics available online about acceptance rates for various
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There is a lot of advice out there on publishing in philosophy (see Aidan McGlynn’s useful compilation). And there are a lot of statistics available online about acceptance rates for various journals (for example, see this page for Philosophers’ Imprint).Adding to those resources, I thought that it might be useful, especially for younger philosophers, to see some data that treats the individual paper as the unit of analysis (as opposed to, say, journals). What sort of expectations can you have for a specific paper when you decide it’s time to submit? What does the process look like “in the trenches” as you work to push a paper across the finish line?To help provide some perspective, I reviewed my records and found that I had data on 49 papers recently published in journals. Here are some potentially informative statistics. Make of them what you will!In order for a paper to be accepted, on average, I had to submit it to 3.49 (minimum 1, maximum 10) different journals and. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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