Moral Priorities

Robin Hanson notes that people generally don't like "ranking the sacred" (his example: "fighting cancer" vs. "working for racial justice").  This is a big part of what Effective Altruism is all
Philosophy News image
Robin Hanson notes that people generally don't like "ranking the sacred" (his example: "fighting cancer" vs. "working for racial justice").  This is a big part of what Effective Altruism is all about -- not just aiming to do some good, but seriously taking an evidence-based approach to doing the most (expected) good that one can (for a given level of investment, be it of time, money, or whatever).  This seems to rub some people the wrong way, which is frustrating since we should surely prefer that people allocate their moral efforts wisely, doing more rather than less good when possible.Is it ever reasonable to criticize people for being unduly concerned about a low-priority moral goal? One often sees this in political conflicts, where the Blue and Red teams each become focused on "opposed" moral concerns (e.g. racism/sexism vs false accusations thereof), and accuse the other of exaggerating the harms on one side while neglecting those on the other.  This would. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Philosophy, et cetera

blog comments powered by Disqus