Nonviolence, revolution, and the Arab Spring

In 2011, the Middle East saw more people peacefully protesting long entrenched dictatorships than at any time in its history. The dictators of Tunisia, Egypt, and Yemen were deposed in a matter of
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In 2011, the Middle East saw more people peacefully protesting long-entrenched dictatorships than at any time in its history. The dictators of Tunisia, Egypt, and Yemen were deposed in a matter of weeks by nonviolent marches. Described as ‘the Arab Spring’, the revolution has been convulsing the whole region ever since. We sat down with Chibli Mallat — legal practitioner, academic, rule of law and human rights proponent, and author of the newly released book Philosophy of Nonviolence: Revolution, Constitutionalism, and Justice beyond the Middle East — to discuss how 2011 may have ushered in a fundamental break in world history, a break animated by nonviolence. What is nonviolence theory? Rather than nonviolence ‘theory’, I use the term philosophy, in a tradition known since Hegel as ‘philosophy of history’. A philosophy of nonviolence stands in contradistinction with a recorded history of some 4000 years of the human journey in which violence is the main nexus,. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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