The Normativity of Meaning and Content

[Revised entry by Kathrin Glüer and Åsa Wikforss on April 27, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] There is a long tradition of thinking of language as conventional in its
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[Revised entry by Kathrin Glüer and Åsa Wikforss on April 27, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] There is a long tradition of thinking of language as conventional in its nature, dating back at least to Aristotle (De Interpretatione). By appealing to the role of conventions, it is thought, we can distinguish linguistic signs, the meaningful use of words, from mere natural 'signs'. During the last century the thesis that language is essentially conventional has played a central role within philosophy of language, and has even been called...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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