Formal Semantics and Experimental Philosophy

The idea of using experiments to address philosophical questions has provoked heated debate in many areas of philosophy. However, if there is one area in which this approach has been completely
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The idea of using experiments to address philosophical questions has provoked heated debate in many areas of philosophy. However, if there is one area in which this approach has been completely uncontroversial, it is the field of formal semantics. This field unites researchers in philosophy and linguistics in an interdisciplinary attempt to make progress on semantic questions. The field has always understood itself as an empirical one, and researchers within it have basically welcomed the arrival of experimental techniques with open arms.Just in the past few years, philosophers working in formal semantics have authored or coauthored experimental papers on vagueness (Egré et al., Ripley), the relationship between semantics and pragmatics (Chemla, Homer & Rothschild), conditionals (Cariani & Rips), generics (Prasada, Khemlani, Leslie & Glucksberg), modals (Knobe & Szabó; Knobe & Yalcin), the language of probability (Yalcin), gradable aesthetic adjectives (Liao &. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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