Moral Conscience through the Ages: Fifth Century BCE to the Present

2015.03.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard Sorabji, Moral Conscience through the Ages: Fifth Century BCE to the Present, University of Chicago Press, 2014, 265pp.,
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2015.03.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard Sorabji, Moral Conscience through the Ages: Fifth Century BCE to the Present, University of Chicago Press, 2014, 265pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780226182728. Reviewed by Stephen Darwall, Yale University In this fascinating and magisterial study, Richard Sorabji both demonstrates and describes the intense interest philosophers have had in the ethically central phenomenon of conscience ever since the ancients. The book's appearance is much to be welcomed, especially since the topic has been relatively absent from recent ethical philosophy and moral psychology.[1] Readers will find here both excellent history of philosophy and, it may be hoped, a stimulus to contemporary thought. According to Sorabji, the Greek term for conscience, 'suneidêsis', "began to appear with some of its eventual meaning" in Greek playwrights of the fifth century BCE. Its original meaning illustrates much of the concept's. . .

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