Intuition

2015.01.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Elijah Chudnoff, Intuition, Oxford University Press, 2013, 245pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199683000. Reviewed by John
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2015.01.04 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Elijah Chudnoff, Intuition, Oxford University Press, 2013, 245pp., $50.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199683000. Reviewed by John Bengson, University of Wisconsin-Madison There is a long tradition in philosophy, going back to Plato and Descartes, of ascribing to the human intellect the power to directly apprehend, or intuit, abstract truths, without basis in sensory experience or mere relations of ideas. In the mid-twentieth century the tradition was opposed by Quine, whose radical empiricism (and naturalism) did not tolerate any such a priori exploits, and before him by Ayer and Carnap, whose semantic rationalism (and positivism) acknowledged the a priori but only as narrowly tied to conceptual understanding of analytic statements. Recent, post-Quinean philosophy has seen a resurgence of interest in rationalism -- what George Bealer has called a "rationalist renaissance". But many contemporary proponents, including. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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