Of Lies & Disagreements

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/2119780 When people disagree on controversial issues it is not uncommon for one person to accuse another of lying. In some cases this accusation is clearly
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/2119780 When people disagree on controversial issues it is not uncommon for one person to accuse another of lying. In some cases this accusation is clearly warranted and in others it is clearly not. Discerning between these cases is clearly a matter of legitimate concern. There is also some confusion of what should count as a lie and what should not. While this might seem like a matter of mere semantics, the distinction between what is a lie and what is not actually matters. The main reason for this is that to accuse a person of lying is, in general, to lay a moral charge against the person. It is not merely to claim that the person is in error but to claim that the person is engaged in something that is morally wrong. While some people do use “lie” interchangeably with “untruth”, there is clearly a difference. To use an easy and obvious example, imagine a student who is asked which year the United States dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima. The. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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