College Education for Prisoners

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/73979720 At one time, inmates in the United States were eligible for government Pell tuition grants and there was a college prison program. Then Congress decided
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/73979720 At one time, inmates in the United States were eligible for government Pell tuition grants and there was a college prison program. Then Congress decided that prisoners should not get such grants and this effectively doomed the college prison programs. Fortunately, people like Max Kenner have worked hard to bring college education to prisoners once more. Kenner has worked with Bard College to offer college education with prisoners and this program seems to have been a success. As might be imagined, there are some interesting ethical issues here. One approach to college education for prisoners is both ethical and practical. If it is accepted that one function of the prison system is to reform prisoners so that they do not return to crime after they are released, then there seems to be a very good reason to support such programs. Since 2001 about 300 prisoners have received college degrees from Bard. Of those released from prison, it is claimed. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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