Non-monotonic Logic

[Revised entry by Christian Strasser and G. Aldo Antonelli on December 2, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, abcd.png, ford1.png, ford2.png, inheritance.png, nixon-floating.png, nixon.png,
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[Revised entry by Christian Strasser and G. Aldo Antonelli on December 2, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, abcd.png, ford1.png, ford2.png, inheritance.png, nixon-floating.png, nixon.png, notes.html, num-args.png, suppl1.html, tweety-drowner.png, tweety.png, venn.png, zombie.png] The term "non-monotonic logic" (in short, NML) covers a family of formal frameworks devised to capture and represent defeasible inference, i.e., that kind of inference in which reasoners draw conclusions tentatively, reserving the right to retract them in the light of further information. Examples are numerous, reaching from...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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