Living Without Why: Meister Eckhart’s Critique of the Medieval Concept of Will

2014.12.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John M. Connolly, Living Without Why: Meister Eckhart’s Critique of the Medieval Concept of Will, Oxford University Press, 2014,
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2014.12.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John M. Connolly, Living Without Why: Meister Eckhart’s Critique of the Medieval Concept of Will, Oxford University Press, 2014, 236pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199359783. Reviewed by Peter Eardley, University of Guelph One of the more fertile areas of research in medieval philosophy today falls under the broad umbrella of moral psychology. Although no one can say for sure, one of the reasons for such interest presumably has something to do with the perennial relevance of questions about the freedom of the will, the role of the emotions in the moral life, the nature of the virtues, and the question of moral weakness, all issues that received serious treatment during the medieval period. Hence, since about the mid-1990s, there has been a real resurgence of interest in this area of medieval philosophy, the work of Bonnie Kent (1995), Risto Saarinen (1994), F.-X. Putallaz (1995), and many others immediately. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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