Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature

2014.12.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Rudrum, Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013, 285pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2014.12.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews David Rudrum, Stanley Cavell and the Claim of Literature, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013, 285pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781421410487. Reviewed by Gerald Bruns, University of Notre Dame Stanley Cavell belongs to a generation of Anglo-American philosophers -- D. Z. Phillips, Martha Nussbaum, Alasdair MacIntyre, among others -- who took a more than recreational interest in literature. What exactly is the nature of Cavell's interest? That, basically, is the regulating question of David Rudrum's study, whose chapters are devoted to Cavell's writings on Thoreau, Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Poe, and Ibsen. And in the bargain we get a Cavellian reading of a text that Cavell seems not to have taken up: Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, with its themes of the ordinary and the tragic -- tragedy, moreover, that is distinctively American (not, for once, a fall of the mighty). Rudrum begins, however, by carefully. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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