The Nature of Philosophical Problems: Their Causes and Implications

2014.11.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Kekes, The Nature of Philosophical Problems: Their Causes and Implications, Oxford University Press, 2014, 238pp., $55.00
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2014.11.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Kekes, The Nature of Philosophical Problems: Their Causes and Implications, Oxford University Press, 2014, 238pp., $55.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198712756. Reviewed by Robert Almeder, Georgia State University The author's Introduction begins with a quote from Ludwig Wittgenstein: What is the use of studying philosophy if all it does for you is to enable you to talk with some plausibility about some abstruse questions of logic, etc., and if it does not improve your thinking about the important questions of everyday life. (vii) Kekes then states that his aim is to explain why basic philosophical problems are perennial, why they are exceptionally difficult, and "why many centuries of hard work by excellent minds has not resulted in a generally acceptable solution of any of them" (vii). He believes that many excellent books and articles trading in ingenious counterexamples are, and have been, written with. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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