Factions & Fallacies

http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/151367815 In general, human beings readily commit to factions and then engage in very predictable behavior: they regard their own factions as right, good and
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http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/151367815 In general, human beings readily commit to factions and then engage in very predictable behavior: they regard their own factions as right, good and truthful while casting opposing factions as wrong, evil and deceitful. While the best known factions tend to be political or religious, people can form factions around almost anything, ranging from sports teams to video game consoles. While there can be rational reasons to form and support a faction, factionalism tends to be fed and watered by cognitive biases and fallacies. The core cognitive bias of factionalism is what is commonly known as in group bias. This is the psychology tendency to easily form negative views of those outside of the faction. For example, Democrats often regard Republicans in negative terms, casting them as uncaring, sexist, racist and fixated on money. In turn, Republicans typically look at Republicans in negative terms and regard them as fixated on abortion, obsessed. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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