Implicit Bias in Academic Service Expectations

I recently came across Brian Weatherson's excellent post from earlier in the year on "very junior [female] faculty doing demanding administrative tasks [...] at the level of workload of being a
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I recently came across Brian Weatherson's excellent post from earlier in the year on "very junior [female] faculty doing demanding administrative tasks [...] at the level of workload of being a chair of a search committee."  He continues:It is possible in principle that these faculty could be getting enough teaching relief that they have as much time for research as any other junior faculty. Even if so, I think it would be better to be teaching than doing admin. Teaching advanced courses is good for research, teaching lower level courses gives you re-usable teaching materials, and generally teaching is good training for teaching. No one cares how well you administrate; they do care how well you teach. In short, generous teaching reductions would make these administrative assignments less horrible, but wouldn’t I think make them acceptable.There has been a growing awareness in recent years of the harms done by gendered implicit bias in academic hiring/recruitment. It. . .

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News source: Philosophy, et cetera

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