experimental philosophy of manipulation

Josh Knobe recently prompted a discussion on Flickers about a forthcoming paper that offers a psychological explanation of why manipulation intuitively reduces the extent to which agents are blamed
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Josh Knobe recently prompted a discussion on Flickers about a forthcoming paper that offers a psychological explanation of why manipulation intuitively reduces the extent to which agents are blamed for doing immoral acts (full disclosure: I'm an author on that paper). Given that discussion, I thought it might also be worth mentioning the emerging experimental philosophy work on manipulation more generally. A number of people, including Dylan Murray, Tania Lombrozo, Eddy Nahmias and Oisin Deery, have already started working on the topic, and to me at least it seems like a really exciting moment where research in this area is starting to take off.I'll start by giving you a basic sense of the specific effect that I focused on, but then will also try to point to the more general question that a growing number of people are interested in. The original effect is probably most easily demonstrated by example, so try considering this first case:In the 1950s, the government of a small Eastern. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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