Subverting Aristotle: Religion, History, and Philosophy in Early Modern Science

2014.08.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Craig Martin, Subverting Aristotle: Religion, History, and Philosophy in Early Modern Science, Johns Hopkins University Press,
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2014.08.10 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Craig Martin, Subverting Aristotle: Religion, History, and Philosophy in Early Modern Science, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2014, 262pp., $54.95 (hbk), ISBN 9781421413167. Reviewed by David Clemenson, University of St. Thomas (MN) This book's main thesis seems well summarized by the following passage: (A)  The motivations of seventeenth-century innovators in natural philosophy, whether Protestant or Catholic, were deeply religious. Their abandonment of Peripatetic philosophy arose, at least in part, from the conviction that the best historical studies of the day demonstrated that Aristotle deviated from Christianity giving permission to seek more pious alternatives. (p. 177) (A) seems to entail (B)  Most seventeenth-century innovators in natural philosophy, or the most important and influential ones, were motivated mainly by Christian faith. The book offers no convincing argument for (B). It does not. . .

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