Violence: Thinking Without Banisters

2014.07.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard J. Bernstein, Violence: Thinking Without Banisters, Polity, 2013, 228pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745670645. Reviewed
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2014.07.33 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Richard J. Bernstein, Violence: Thinking Without Banisters, Polity, 2013, 228pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745670645. Reviewed by Seyla Benhabib, Yale University Violence has accompanied human culture from its earliest beginnings, and representations of violence in art, narrative and song are ubiquitous. Yet it is only in certain periods that violence emerges as a major preoccupation of political thinkers: Machiavelli's The Prince (1532); Edmund Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1820), Ernst Junger's Storm of Steel (In Stahlgewittern, 1924) and Georges Sorel's Réflexions sur la Violence (1908) are major works that have explored violence in different periods. Why has violence resurfaced in contemporary thought in the first decades of the twenty-first century? Richard Bernstein observes that We live in a time when we are overwhelmed with talk, writing, and especially images of violence. Whether. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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