Question about Death, Ethics - Allen Stairs responds

If you allow someone to die when you are capable of saving they life, but do not kill them directly, are you a murderer? Response from: Allen Stairs In both the legal and the familiar sense of
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If you allow someone to die when you are capable of saving they life, but do not kill them directly, are you a murderer? Response from: Allen Stairs In both the legal and the familiar sense of the word "murderer," the answer is no. You certainly wouldn't be charged with murder in a case like this, and if you were, successfully arguing that you didn't actually kill the person but merely allowed them to die would lead to a "not guilty" verdict. Murder, as it's usually understood, is unlawful killing or, in the non-legal sense, morally unjustified killing.That said, someone might argue that if you're in a position to save someone's life and you don't, then you're guilty of something just as bad as murder. No doubt we can come up with hypothetical cases where this might be so. For instance: Alex intends to kill Bob; he's got the means and the will. But on his way to do the deed, he discovers Bob unconscious and bleeding by the side of the road. Suppose it's clear that Alex could save. . .

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